Home / Default / We Don’t Get What We Wish For, We Get What We Work For

We Don’t Get What We Wish For, We Get What We Work For

“Work is a blessing when it helps us to think about what we are doing; but it becomes a curse when its sole use is to stop us thinking about the meaning of life.”
― Paulo Coelho

“So, let us summon a new spirit of patriotism, of responsibility, where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look over not only ourselves, but each other.”
― Barack Obama

“The strength of the team is each individual member. The strength of each member is the team.”
― Phil Jackson

“Men of lofty genius when they are doing the least work are most active.”
― Leonardo da Vinci

“Spring work is going on with joyful enthusiasm.”
― John Muir, The Wilderness World of John Muir

“But every acquisition that is disproportionate to the labor spent on it is dishonest.”
― Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

“I never realized
till now
how hard the brain has to work
to make the body do what it asks.

Or maybe how hard the body has to work
to ignore
the brain.”
― Thalia Chaltas, Because I Am Furniture

“My life changed the day I moved beyond just wishing for things and I started earning them. That is the day I learned that we don’t get what we wish for, we get what we work for.”
― Steve Maraboli, Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience

“Good human work honors God’s work. Good work uses no thing without respect, both for what it is in itself and for its origin. It uses neither tool nor material that it does not respect and that it does not love. It honors nature as a great mystery and power, as an indispensable teacher, and as the inescapable judge of all work of human hands. It does not dissociate life and work, or pleasure and work, or love and work, or usefulness and beauty. To work without pleasure or affection, to make a product that is not both useful and beautiful, is to dishonor God, nature, the thing that is made, and whomever it is made for. This is blasphemy: to make shoddy work of the work of God. But such blasphemy is not possible when the entire Creation is understood as holy and when the works of God are understood as embodying and thus revealing His spirit. (pg. 312, Christianity and the Survival of Creation)”
― Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays